Providence Place

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Coordinates: 41°49′40.58″N 71°24′59.24″W / 41.8279389°N 71.4164556°W / 41.8279389; -71.4164556

Providence Place
ProvidencePlaceMallWestin.jpg
Providence Place with Omni Providence Hotel at far left in the background.
LocationProvidence, Rhode Island, USA
AddressOne Providence Place
Providence, Rhode Island 02903
Opening dateAugust 20, 1999; 19 years ago (1999-08-20)
ManagementBrookfield Properties Retail Group
OwnerBrookfield Properties Retail Group[1]
No. of stores and services160
No. of anchor tenants1 (1 under redevelopment)
Total retail floor area1,400,000 sq ft (130,000 m2)
No. of floors3
Websiteprovidenceplace.com

Providence Place is a shopping mall in Providence, Rhode Island. With 1,400,000 sq ft (130,000 m2) of gross leasable area, it has been the largest shopping mall in Rhode Island since it opened in 1999, it is currently owned by Brookfield Properties Retail Group.

As of 2019, the mall is anchored by department store Macy's. Previous anchors include Filene's, J. C. Penney, Lord & Taylor, and Nordstrom. Department store Boscov's will open in the former Nordstrom in fall 2019.

History[edit]

Providence Place opened in 1999 with original anchors Lord & Taylor, Filene's, and Nordstrom; Lord & Taylor was later replaced by JCPenney, which itself was replaced with an expanded parking garage following the latter store's closure in 2015.[2] Filene's was converted to Macy's in 2006. Nordstrom closed on January 4, 2019 and will become Boscov's in Fall 2019.[3]

Michael Townsend, Adriana Yoto and six other artists covertly built an apartment in a 750-square-foot (70 m2) loft in one of the mall's parking garages in 2004 and lived there for up to three weeks at a time while documenting mall life. After the fully furnished apartment was discovered by mall security, Townsend was sentenced to probation on October 2, 2007.[4][5]

Architecture[edit]

The mall was built on land previously occupied by a dirt parking lot called "Ray's Park & Lock." The proposed design was met by opposition from residents on the city's East Side; developers changed the initial design to fit better into the neighborhood. The new design included more red and yellow brick and turrets on the roof, to reflect Providence's industrial past.[6]

The design of the mall was partly done by the architect Friedrich St. Florian.[7] He also built the skybridge that connected the mall with the Omni Providence Hotel (formerly the Westin Hotel).

In total, Providence Place consists of fifteen levels; the lowest three are labeled C-A (P1-P3). Level C consists of Parking-Only Stateside, and Street Level Restaurants Cityside. There is also a level D on the Stateside garage. Level B consists of DSW shoes and Restaurants, Old Navy stateside, Bed Bath & Beyond cityside and The Skybrige to the Westin. Level A consists of parking only, both cityside and stateside. Cityside is the mall's southern end, facing Downtown. Stateside is the mall's northern end, facing state office buildings including the State Capitol.

The fifth through ninth levels are labeled 1, 1M (1.5), 2, 2M (2.5) and 3, which features the indoor galleria. There is a Dave & Buster's, an IMAX theatre, and a 16-screen cinema on the seventh level; the mall also hosts two large parking garages, one cityside and the other stateside, anchored to its back end. Bridges connect the two sides over the Woonasquatucket River.

The mall's Winter Garden is a noticeable architectural feature; the four-level structure in the center of the mall spans the Woonasquatucket River and Amtrak's Northeast Corridor line. The area features large expanses of glass providing views of the city; the third level of the Winter Garden contains the food court and access to its fourth level, serving as the entrance to Dave and Buster's, the IMAX theater, and the cinema. Although not directly connected to the mall, Amtrak's Providence Station is located approximately 200 yards east of the mall, providing Acela Express and Northeast Regional service to Boston, New York City, and Washington, D.C.. The tracks seem to go through the City Side parking lot.

In early 2017, the garages were renovated; some of the renovation's features are a light system that tells a driver where a place to park is. If the light is green, open spots are in that area, red signifies no spots available, and blue is for notice of handicapped spots. Another big change is that the garage floors are color code, each floor is represented by a different color. Floor P1, the bottom most floor, is Brown, P2 is Blue, P3 is Red, L1 is Purple, L1.5 is Yellow, L2 is Green, L2.5 is Orange, and L3 is Pink. There are signs alerting shoppers how many spaces on each level are empty; the last additions to the renovations are redone entrance designs and turning the first two floors of the former JCPenney into more parking. The renovation was completed at the end of 2017.

Reception[edit]

The health of Providence Place has been questioned since 2016, following the closure of J.C. Penney and increasing popularity of Garden City Shopping Center in Cranston for upscale shopping.[8] GoLocalProv noted that several "higher-tier retailers and restaurants have been replaced with lower-priced retailers or are vacant," and opined that the closure of Nordstrom signaled that "the once gem of the city is now in near free fall."[9]

Anchor Stores[edit]

Former Anchor Stores[edit]

  • Filene's - Opened 1999, became Macy's in 2006
  • Lord & Taylor - Opened 1999, closed 2005
  • JCPenney - Opened 2005, closed 2015
  • Nordstrom - opened 1999, closed January 4, 2019, to be replaced by Boscov's in Late 2019.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Providence Place". Brookfield Properties Retail Group.
  2. ^ https://pbn.com/jc-penney-store-closing-at-providence-place-mall102639/
  3. ^ https://www.wpri.com/business-news/nordstrom-at-providence-place-closing-boscovs-coming/1509822244
  4. ^ "Artist gets probation for building secret mall apartment". NBC News. Associated Press. October 2, 2007.
  5. ^ SELIN DAVIS, LISA (August 15, 2008). "The couple who lived in a mall". Salon.
  6. ^ Kostrzewa, John (December 25, 2016). "John Kostrzewa: A winter night's tour of the Providence skyline". The Providence Journal. Retrieved December 25, 2016. Just across Memorial Boulevard, you can't miss Providence Place, the huge mall built in 1999 on land once used by Ray's Park & Lock, a dirt lot for 450 cars. ... When the mall was proposed, some East Siders ... complained it looked like an aircraft carrier. They convinced public officials to change the design to include more red brick (and special yellow brick for Nordstrom) and turrets on the roof to fit the city's industrial past.
  7. ^ http://www.brown.edu/Administration/News_Bureau/2005-06/05-128.html
  8. ^ Belknap, Erin (October 20, 2017). "What's Next For Providence Place?". Providence Online. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  9. ^ "What is the Future of Providence Place Mall?". GoLocalProv. January 14, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2019.

External links[edit]