Sloughi

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Sloughi
Sloughi sandcolor.jpg
Other namesArabian Greyhound
Sloughi Moghrebi
OriginMorocco (Std. resp.)
Algeria
Tunisia
Libya
Egypt
Classification / standards
FCI Group 10, Section 3 Short-haired Sighthounds #188 standard
AKC Hound standard
ANKC Group 4 (Hounds) standard
KC (UK) Hounds standard
NZKC Hounds standard
UKC Sighthound & Pariah standard
Domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris)

The Sloughi /ˈslɡi/[1] (Berber language: oṣkay or occay) is a North African breed of dog, specifically a member of the sighthound family. It is found mainly in Morocco, which is responsible for the standard, and may be found in smaller numbers elsewhere in North Africa.[2]

Description[edit]

Appearance[edit]

The sloughi should not to be confused with the smooth Saluki of the Arabian peninsula and the Middle East, nor to be confused with the smooth Afghan Hound; the Sloughi is a medium-large, short-haired, smooth-coated, athletic sighthound developed in the Berber world of North Africa (in the area including Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya) to hunt game such as hare, fox, jackal, gazelle, and wild pigs. It is an ancient breed, treasured in North Africa for its hunting skills, speed, agility, and endurance over long distances, it is a robust, but elegant and racy, pursuit dog with no exaggeration of length of body or limbs, muscle development, angulation, nor curve of loin. The Sloughi is not a fragile dog, but is also a dog with class and grace; the attitude is noble and somewhat aloof, and the expression of the dark eyes is gentle and melancholy.

The Sloughi's head is long and elegant with drop ears; the body and legs show defined bony structure and strong, lean muscles. The skeletal structure is sturdy; the topline is essentially horizontal blending into a bony, gently sloping croup. The tail is long and carried low with an upward curve at the end.[3]

Temperament[edit]

Consistent with many sighthounds, the Sloughi has a sensitive character that is devoted to its owner and family, it does not respond well to harsh or corporal training methods and does best with an owner who is also sensitive, intelligent and conscientious. The Sloughi responds best to training that is based on positive reinforcement.

Health[edit]

Only a few genetic conditions have been confirmed in the breed; these include certain autoimmune disorders, such as Addison's disease and irritable bowel syndrome and progressive retinal atrophy. The Sloughi is one of the breeds for whom a genetic test for progressive retinal atrophy has been developed to with a simple blood test. Like all sighthounds, the Sloughi is very sensitive to anesthesia, and can be sensitive to vaccines, worming, and other medications—so these routine treatments should be spaced apart instead of given all at once; the breed tends to enjoy excellent health into old age.

History[edit]

Arabian Greyhound circa 1915

The Sloughi has existed for centuries in North Africa, and is largely found in Morocco. Morocco is responsible for the breed's FCI Standard;[4] the Sloughi was and still is used for hunting in its native countries, and also is a reliable guard dog. Today, the Sloughi is mainly found in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya; the Sloughi received full recognition by the American Kennel Club as of January 1, 2016 when it became eligible to compete in the AKC Hound Group.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Sloughi". Encarta. Microsoft Corporation. 1997–2008. Archived from the original on 2009-11-01. Retrieved 2008-12-05.
  2. ^ FCI entry for "Sloughi"
  3. ^ http://cdn.akc.org/Sloughi.pdf?_ga=1.74360786.1380922360.1452568928
  4. ^ FCI Breed Standard
  5. ^ American Kennel Club | http://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/sloughi/ | Retrieved=5 Jan 2016

References[edit]

  • "Sloughi: The Arabian Sighthound", 1996, by Ermine Moreau-Sipiere, Alet Publishing.
  • "Sloughi", 2004, by Dr. M.-D Crapon de Caprona, Kennel Club books
  • "The Sloughi 1852-1952" 2008, by Dr. M.-D. Crapon de Caprona, Signature printing.
  • The Sloughi, Breed Standard, American Kennel Club, 2016 [1]

External links[edit]