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Storey County, Nevada

Storey County is a county located in the U. S. state of Nevada. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,010, making it the third-least populous county in Nevada, its county seat is Virginia City. Storey County is part of NV Metropolitan Statistical Area. Storey County was created in 1861 and named for Captain Edward Farris Storey, killed in 1860 in the Pyramid Lake War, it was the most populous county in Nevada when organized in 1861. Virginia City is the county seat, it was to be named McClellan County after General George B. McClellan, who ran unsuccessfully against Abraham Lincoln for President in the 1864 election. Storey County benefited from the discovery of Comstock Lode silver. In 1969, the actor Dick Simmons played W. Frank Stewart, a silver mining operator who served from 1876 to 1880 as a state senator for Storey County, in the episode "How to Beat a Badman" of the syndicated television series, Death Valley Days, hosted by Robert Taylor not long before Taylor's own death. In the story line, Senator Stewart is determined to gain at a bargain price a silver claim being worked by two young former outlaws.

The county population collapsed after the Comstock Lode was mined and hit a minimum of 568 in the 1960 census. Since its population has recovered because of its relative proximity to Reno. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 264 square miles, of which 263 square miles is land and 0.7 square miles is water. Washoe County – north Lyon County – southeast Carson City – southwest As of the census of 2000, there were 3,399 people, 1,462 households, 969 families living in the county; the population density was 13 people per square mile. There were 1,596 housing units at an average density of 6 per square mile; the racial makeup of the county was 93.0% White, 0.3% Black or African American, 1.4% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 1.7% from other races, 2.4% from two or more races. 5.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Of the 1,462 households, 21.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.7% were non-families.

25.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.74. In the county, 19.7% of the population was under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 26.8% from 25 to 44, 35.7% from 45 to 64, 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females, there were 107.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.1 males. The median income for a household in the county was $45,490, the median income for a family was $57,095. Males had a median income of $40,123 versus $26,417 for females; the per capita income for the county was $23,642. 5.8% of the population and 2.5% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 4.2% are under the age of 18 and 4.8% are 65 or older. As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 4,010 people, 1,742 households, 1,141 families living in the county; the population density was 15.3 inhabitants per square mile.

There were 1,990 housing units at an average density of 7.6 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 92.1% white, 1.6% Asian, 1.6% American Indian, 1.0% black or African American, 0.4% Pacific islander, 1.1% from other races, 2.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 5.7% of the population. In terms of ancestry, 20.9% were German, 20.1% were Irish, 11.5% were English, 7.2% were Italian, 2.6% were American. Of the 1,742 households, 23.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.6% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.5% were non-families, 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.76. The median age was 50.5 years. The median income for a household in the county was $61,525 and the median income for a family was $65,121. Males had a median income of $53,936 versus $34,208 for females; the per capita income for the county was $31,079.

About 0.4% of families and 5.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over. There are no incorporated communities in Storey County. Storey County has legal prostitution; the county is trying to lure high-tech businesses. The Tesla Gigafactory 1 has been constructed here. In May 2018, U. S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin instructed his staff to accept tract in the county as an Opportunity zone under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 though it did not qualify as low-income. Michael Milken, who had attended several events with and given a private flight to Mnuchin leading up to the designation, was an investor in the tract. Storey County leans towards the Republican Party, with it voting for every Republican since 1976, with the exception being in 1992, when it voted for Independent Ross Perot. National Register of Historic Places listings in Storey County, Nevada Republic of Molossia – a micronation in southern Storey County List of Nevada brothels – Storey County Official website Overview

Andrei Eberhardt

Andrei Avgustovich Ebergard, better known as Andrei Eberhardt, was an admiral in the Imperial Russian Navy of German ancestry. Eberhardt was born in Patras, where his father was the Russian consul August Eberhardt, he was of Westphalian origin, with his grandfather Johann Karl Eberhardt coming from Hamburg to Russia during the early-19th Century, he was not baptised a Lutheran but an Orthodox. Eberhardt graduated from the Marine Cadet Corps in 1878. From 1882 to 1884, he served in the Pacific Fleet as a signals officer. In 1886, he became a flag officer and adjutant to Admiral Ivan Shestakov and in 1891 he became a flag officer to Admiral Tyrtov commanding the Russian Pacific Squadron. In 1896 Eberhardt was moved to the Black Sea Fleet, where he was gunnery officer on the battleships Ekaterina II and Chesma. In 1898 he moved to the Far East, where he commanded the Admiral Nakhimov and took part in suppressing the Boxer Rebellion. During the Russo–Japanese War, Eberhardt was chief naval aide to Yevgeni Ivanovich Alekseyev, the viceroy of Manchuria.

In 1905, he was captain of the battleship Imperator Aleksandr II and in 1906 he was made captain of the Panteleimon. He was promoted to Rear Admiral in 1907 and Vice Admiral in 1909. Eberhardt was Russia's Chief of the Russian Naval General Staff from 1908 and Commander-in-Chief of the Black Sea Fleet from 1911. During World War I, his top achievement was setting up a naval blockade of the Zonguldak coal fields, choking the coal supply of the German-Turkish fleet, he commanded the Russian battleship squadron during the Battle of Cape Sarych. However he was cautious to start further offensive actions against Turkish positions in the Bosporus and was replaced by Aleksandr Kolchak in 1916. Eberhardt was arrested by the Cheka in 1918 but released, he is buried in the Novodeviche Cemetery in Petrograd. Order of St. Vladimir, 4th class with swords and bow, 3rd degree with swords, 2nd class with swords Gold Sword for Bravery Order of the White Eagle, with swords, Order of St. Alexander Nevsky with diamonds Order of St. Stanislaus, 1st and 2nd classes Order of St. Anne, 1st and 2nd classes Order of St Michael and St George Order of the Rising Sun Commander Grand Cross of the Order of the Sword Knight Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour awarded Commander and Chevalier Commander of the Order of the Redeemer Stephen McLaughlin, The Action off Cape Sarych, In Warship 2001-2002 Conways Maritime Press Media related to Andrei Augostovich Eberhardt at Wikimedia Commons Short biography

Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Croatia entered the Eurovision Song Contest for the first time as an independent country in 1993. The country's first entry was by Put with the song "Don't Ever Cry". Croatia first entered the Eurovision Song Contest in 1993, having competed as a part of Yugoslavia from 1961 to 1991. SR Croatia was the most successful republic of Yugoslavia at Eurovision, with 11 of the 27 entries that won the Yugoslavian selection for the Eurovision Song Contest being Croatian. During the disintegration of Yugoslavia the state broadcaster at the time, JRT, decided to continue Yugoslavia's participation in the contest, holding one last national final for the 1992 Contest, held on 28 March 1992. Only artists from the republics of Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina competed, despite the former declaring independence on 1 March. Artists from Croatia and Macedonia did not compete after declaring independence from Yugoslavia in 1991; the winning song was "Ljubim te pesmama" by Extra Nena. However, by the time Extra Nena competed at Eurovision for Yugoslavia, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was no more, a new republic, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, had been formed.

Croatia's former sub-national broadcaster RTV Zagreb became the country's national broadcaster, renamed Hrvatska radiotelevizija. The broadcaster first attempted to enter the Eurovision Song Contest as an independent nation in 1992, holding a national contest to select a song. However, as the broadcaster was not a member of the European Broadcasting Union at the time they were refused entry to the contest; the winner of the contest was Magazin with the song "Hallelujah". The broadcaster became a member of the European Broadcasting Union on 1 January 1993, allowing it to compete in the Eurovision Song Contest for the first time as an independent nation in 1993. HRT held a national final to select the first independent Croatian entry at Eurovision. Dora 1993 was held at the Crystal Ballroom of Hotel Kvarner in Opatija on 28 February, hosted by Sanja Doležal and Frano Lasić. 15 entries competed, the winner was decided by 11 regional juries. The winning song was "Don't Ever Cry", performed by the band Put.

With the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the disintegration of Yugoslavia many newly independent countries were formed who became interested in competing in the Eurovision Song Contest. With this large influx of countries the European Broadcasting Union were forced to create a new measure to counter overcrowding in the contest. For the 1993 Contest the EBU decided to hold a one-off countest to select three countries to join the 22 countries competing in the Eurovision Song Contest; the Kvalifikacija za Millstreet contest was held in Ljubljana, Slovenia on 3 April at the TV studios of Slovene broadcaster Radiotelevizija Slovenija. Seven countries in total competed, including Croatia, for a place in the final on 15 May 1993. Put performed second, following preceding Estonia; the band received 51 points, placing 3rd, qualifying to the Eurovision Song Contest final alongside Slovenia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Put performed 21st at the Eurovision Song Contest 1993 in Millstreet, following the Netherlands and preceding Spain.

The group received 31 points. Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest Eurovision Song Contest 1993 Kvalifikacija za Millstreet Croatian National Final 1993