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Tapestry

Tapestry is a form of textile art, traditionally woven by hand on a loom. Tapestry is weft-faced weaving, in which all the warp threads are hidden in the completed work, unlike cloth weaving where both the warp and the weft threads may be visible. In tapestry weaving, weft yarns are discontinuous, it is a plain weft-faced weave having weft threads of different colors worked over portions of the warp to form the design. Most weavers use a natural warp thread, such as linen or cotton; the weft threads are wool or cotton but may include silk, silver, or other alternatives. First attested in English in 1467, the word tapestry derives from Old French tapisserie, from tapisser, meaning "to cover with heavy fabric, to carpet", in turn from tapis, "heavy fabric", via Latin tapes, the Latinisation of the Greek τάπης, "carpet, rug"; the earliest attested form of the word is the Mycenaean Greek, ta-pe-ja, written in the Linear B syllabary. The success of decorative tapestry can be explained by its portability.

Kings and noblemen could transport tapestries from one residence to another. In churches, they were displayed on special occasions. Tapestries were draped on the walls of castles for insulation during winter, as well as for decorative display. In the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, a rich tapestry panel woven with symbolic emblems, mottoes, or coats of arms called a baldachin, canopy of state or cloth of state was hung behind and over a throne as a symbol of authority; the seat under such a canopy of state would be raised on a dais. The iconography of most Western tapestries goes back to written sources, the Bible and Ovid's Metamorphoses being two popular choices. Apart from the religious and mythological images, hunting scenes are the subject of many tapestries produced for indoor decoration. Tapestries have been used since at least Hellenistic times. Samples of Greek tapestry have been found preserved in the desert of Tarim Basin dating from the 3rd century BC; the form reached a new stage in Europe in the early 14th century AD.

The first wave of production occurred in Switzerland. Over time, the craft expanded to France and the Netherlands; the basic tools have remained much the same. In the 14th and 15th centuries, France was a thriving textile town; the industry specialised in fine wool tapestries which were sold to decorate palaces and castles all over Europe. Few of these tapestries survived the French Revolution as hundreds were burnt to recover the gold thread, woven into them. "Arras" is still used to refer to a rich tapestry no matter. Indeed, as literary scholar Rebecca Olson argues, Arras were the most valuable objects in England during the early modern period and inspired writers such as William Shakespeare and Edmund Spenser to weave these tapestries into their most important works such as Hamlet and The Faerie Queene. By the 16th century, the towns of Oudenaarde, Brussels and Enghien had become the centres of European tapestry production. In the 17th century, Flemish tapestries were arguably the most important productions, with many specimens of this era still extant, demonstrating the intricate detail of pattern and colour embodied in painterly compositions of monumental scale.

In the 19th century, William Morris resurrected the art of tapestry-making in the medieval style at Merton Abbey. Morris & Co. made successful series of tapestries for home and ecclesiastical uses, with figures based on cartoons by Edward Burne-Jones. Kilims and Navajo rugs are types of tapestry work. In the mid-twentieth century, new tapestry art forms were developed by children at the Ramses Wissa Wassef Art Centre in Harrania, by modern French artists under Jean Lurçat in Aubusson, France. Traditional tapestries are still made at the factory of Gobelins and a few other old European workshops, which repair and restore old tapestries. While tapestries have been created for many centuries and in every continent in the world, what distinguishes the contemporary field from its pre-World War II history is the predominance of the artist as weaver in the contemporary medium; this trend has its roots in France during the 1950s, where one of the "cartoonists" for the Aubusson tapestry studios, Jean Lurçat spearheaded a revival of the medium by streamlining color selection, thereby simplifying production, by organizing a series of Biennial exhibits held in Lausanne, Switzerland.

The Polish work submitted to the first Biennale, which opened in 1962, was quite novel. Traditional workshops in Poland had collapsed as a result of the war. Art supplies in general were hard to acquire. Many Polish artists had learned to weave as part of their art school training and began creating individualistic work by using atypical materials like jute and sisal. With each Biennale the popularity of works focusing on exploring innovative constructions from a wide variety of fiber resounded around the world. There were many weavers in pre-war United States, but there had never been a prolonged system of workshops for producing tapestries. Therefore, weavers in America were self-taught and chose to design as well as weave their art. Through these Lausanne exhibitions, US artists/weavers, others in countries all over the world, were excited about the Polish trend towards experimental forms. Throughout the 1970s all weavers had explored some manner of techniques and materials in vogue at the time.

What this movement contributed to the newly realized field of art weaving, termed "contemporary tapestry", was the option for wor

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Nassau

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Nassau is an archdiocese of the Latin Church of the Catholic Church in the Caribbean. The archdiocese encompasses the islands of the former British dependency of the Bahamas; the archbishop is the metropolitan responsible for the suffragan diocese of Diocese of Hamilton in Bermuda and the Mission sui iuris of Turks and Caicos, is a member of the Antilles Episcopal Conference. The first permanent Roman Catholic presence in the Bahamas was established in 1885 by the Archdiocese of New York given its trade connections; the archdiocese was erected as the Prefecture Apostolic of the Bahama in March 1929, was no longer associated with New York by 1932. The diocese was subsequently elevated to the Vicariate Apostolic of the Bahama Islands in January 1941, to a full diocese, as the diocese of Nassau, in June 1960. On June 22, 1999, the diocese was again elevated as the new Archdiocese of Nassau; as of 2004, the archdiocese contains 30 parishes, 15 active diocesan priests, 14 religious priests, 48,000 Catholics.

It has 28 Women Religious, 14 Religious Brothers, 13 permanent deacons. John Bernard Kevenhoerster O. S. B. Paul Leonard Hagarty O. S. B. Lawrence Aloysius Burke, S. J. appointed Archbishop of Kingston in Jamaica Patrick Christopher Pinder Patrick Christopher Pinder, appointed Archbishop here Archdiocese of Nassau page at catholichierarchy.org retrieved July 18, 2006[http://www.holynamebimini.com Holy Name Catholic Church Bimini Bahamas

2014 NPSL season

The 2014 National Premier Soccer League season was the 102nd season of FIFA-sanctioned soccer in the United States, the 12th season of the NPSL. The season began in May 2014. RVA Football Club were the defending champions, having won their first NPSL title the previous season; the league added a new Northwest Conference in the West Region in 2014. The league split the Great Lakes Conference into two separate conferences, Great Lakes East and Great Lakes West; the Mid-Atlantic Conference was split in two with teams from Virginia and Maryland staying within the Conference and moving to the Northeast Region and the remaining teams forming the new South Atlantic Conference. The Atlantic Conference was renamed the North Atlantic Conference; the following changes regarding team relocation, rebranding, or expansion are effective for the 2014 NPSL season: The region held its annual general meeting in New York, New York, on January 19 at the New York Athletic Club. The region had a third conference for the first time, with the Mid-Atlantic Conference joining the region.

The Atlantic Conference was renamed the North Atlantic Conference. The conference included 7 teams spread across 6 different states for the 2014 season with the addition of expansion club Greater Lowell United FC. Kabba Joof, Head Coach of Rhode Island Reds FC served as the Conference commissioner; the maximum travel distance for the season was between Seacoast United Mariners and the New York City area clubs at just over 300 miles. The Conference was called the Atlantic Conference in previous seasons; the region held its annual general meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on January 17 during the NSCAA Annual Convention. In 2014 the South Region was split between four Conferences. Prior to the season, the Mid-Atlantic Conference was split in two with some teams joining the Northeast Region – Mid-Atlantic Conference and some forming the new South Atlantic Conference. Due to unforeseen circumstances, Puerto Rico FC did not participate in the 2014 NPSL season. In a new format for 2014, the top four teams of the Southeast Conference played for a spot in the South Region playoffs.

In past years, the leader at the end of the regular season claimed the title. The host venue for the Southeast Conference Playoffs was selected through a bid process; the winner continued on to the South Region playoffs. Pensacola started the season but folded on May 29, 2014, negating 4 games played and cancelling all future games. For 2014, the South Central added six new teams; the Conference was divided with four teams in each division. Each team played the other three teams twice, once home and once away, the four teams in the other division once, two home and two away, randomly selected; the top two teams from each division with the most points advanced to the South Central Conference playoffs, with the first place team in the North playing the second place team in the South and the first place team in the South playing the second place team in the North. The winner of those two games played for the South Central Conference Championship. A preseason tournament called the Red River Cup between Tulsa, Oklahoma City FC, Liverpool Warriors, Fort Worth was hosted by Tulsa on May 2 and 3.

Playoff dates for the South Central Conference will be Friday, July 11 with the final on Sunday, July 13. The winner continued on to the South Region playoffs. North Division South Division The region held its annual general meeting in Madison, Wisconsin, on January 11; the Great Lakes Conference has been split into two conferences: Great Lakes West and Great Lakes East. Teams played a total of 14 games with a single match up against teams from the other Great Lakes Conference; the Midwest Region Champion was decided by a weekend tournament among the winner of each of the three conferences, as well as one wild card team. The wild card was awarded to the remaining team from among all the conferences with the highest regular season points-per-game. Seeding for the playoff weekend was determined by points-per-game over the regular season. Two semi-final matches took place on Saturday, July 19 with a final taking place on Sunday, July 20; each conference champion receives a playoff berth. The next best team based on points per game receives a playoff berth as the wildcard team.

For 2014, a new Northwest Conference was added. This brought the number of Conferences in the West Region to three; the region held its annual general meeting in San Diego, California, on January 12. The Sunshine Conference played a conference playoff from July 10-12th with the top four teams in the conference participating; the entire playoffs was held at one location. In a new format for 2014, the top four teams of the Southeast Conference played for a spot in the South Region playoffs; the host venue for the Southeast Conference Playoffs was Finley Stadium in Chattanooga. The winner continued on to the South Region playoffs; the top two teams from each division with the most points advanced to the South Central Conference playoffs, with the first place team in the North playing the second place team in the South and the first place team in the South playing the second place team in the North. The winner of those two games played for the South Central Conference Championship; the winner continued on to the South Region playoffs.

*Conference ChampionsBold Winneritalics Team with home-field advantage