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The April Fools

The April Fools is a 1969 American romantic comedy film directed by Stuart Rosenberg and starring Jack Lemmon and Catherine Deneuve. Howard Brubaker is married to Phyllis. Catherine is the stunning wife of an uncaring husband, Howard's philandering boss, Ted Gunther; the evening of the day Ted promotes Howard, Howard attends Ted's house party where Ted urges him to pick up an available woman there and proceeds to show him how. Howard reluctantly tries it on Catherine, who accepts; the two go out for a little adventure on the town. Ted is oblivious; the two find their marriages are loveless as they discover more about each other that night and decide to run away together the next evening. But Ted doesn't realize the other man is Howard until Howard and Catherine are about to board the plane to Paris; the female lead was going to be played by Shirley MacLaine but she was not available due to commitments on Sweet Charity and campaigning for Robert F. Kennedy. Catherine Deneuve was cast instead; the New York Times review said, "The April Fools, written by Hal Dresner and directed by Stuart Rosenberg, manipulates its stereotypes with elegance and style....

The best things in the movie, are the extraordinarily good supporting performances by Peter Lawford, Jack Weston, Harvey Korman, Sally Kellerman, by two stars who invented movie elegance 30 years ago, Charles Boyer and Myrna Loy." Published in advance of the film's release, a paperback screenplay novelization by the ubiquitous and gifted tie-in scribe William Johnston was issued by Popular Library. The April Fools Performed by Dionne Warwick w. Hal David m. Burt Bacharach I Say a Little Prayer w. Hal David m. Burt Bacharach The April Fools was released to DVD by CBS Home Entertainment through Paramount Home Media Distribution on January 28, 2014 as a Region 1 Widescreen DVD. List of American films of 1969 The April Fools on IMDb The April Fools at the TCM Movie Database The April Fools at AllMovie The April Fools at Rotten Tomatoes

Wakefield, Kansas

Wakefield is a city in Clay County, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 980. Wakefield was founded in 1869, it was named for one of its founders, Rev. Richard Wake, but because another founder was a native of Wakefield, England; the railroad was built through Wakefield in 1873. Wakefield is located at 39°12′58″N 97°0′55″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.50 square miles, all of it land. The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Wakefield has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. Kansas Landscape Arboretum As of the census of 2010, there were 980 people, 357 households, 272 families living in the city; the population density was 1,960.0 inhabitants per square mile. There were 413 housing units at an average density of 826.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 94.7% White, 0.4% African American, 0.6% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.3% from other races, 3.5% from two or more races.

Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.5% of the population. There were 357 households of which 41.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.9% were married couples living together, 14.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.2% had a male householder with no wife present, 23.8% were non-families. 21.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.08. The median age in the city was 35.5 years. 28.8% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 51.6 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 838 people, 323 households, 231 families living in the city; the population density was 1,774.7 people per square mile. There were 362 housing units at an average density of 766.6 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 95.94% White, 0.84% African American, 1.07% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.60% from other races, 1.43% from two or more races.

Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.19% of the population. There were 323 households out of which 39.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.4% were married couples living together, 5.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.2% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.11. In the city, the population was spread out with 29.7% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, 11.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.1 males. The median income for a household in the city was $41,719, the median income for a family was $50,526. Males had a median income of $31,875 versus $19,833 for females; the per capita income for the city was $16,939. About 4.2% of families and 9.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.6% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.

Wakefield is served by Wakefield High School. The Wakefield High School mascot is Bombers and the school colors are blue and white; the Wakefield Bombers won the Kansas State High School Boys class 1A Cross Country championship in 1973, 1984 and 1985. William Avery, Governor of Kansas from 1965 to 1967 Milford Lake and Milford State Park CityCity of Wakefield Wakefield - Directory of Public OfficialsSchoolsUSD 379, local school districtMapsWakefield City Map, KDOT

Little Brother (Baillie novel)

Little Brother is a 1985 children's novel by award winning Australian author Allan Baillie about life in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge. It was illustrated by Elizabeth Honey, it follows a young boy, separated from his elder brother whilst attempting to flee the terror of the reign of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. It provides an insight into the general plight of refugees using the specific instance of this horrible experience as a backdrop. Muong Vithy is the main character of Little Brother. Vithy has worked with his big brother Mang, their sister and their mother and father are gone. They run away, trying to escape from the Khmer Rouge, they manage to get away, but not for long. Mang has advice for getting away: "Follow the lines... to the border." Vithy is puzzled about the advice. What lines? Which border? They are separated as they run for their life and Vithy is left alone in the forest; the soldiers leave him, no doubt pursuing Mang. Vithy starts traveling to Cambodia's border; as he is traveling beside the road he sees soldiers - not the Khmer Rouge.

He finds himself on the outskirts of the now deserted Phnom Penh, finds a little gold leaf and meets a boy, the King. Vithy stays in the King's City and fixes a motor for him; when they are working for their meals the King hides Vithy in a truck, gives him the gold leaf as payment for the motor and some water. The truck travels near Angkor. Vithy walks for a few hours, he finds himself face to face with a young boy, though much older than himself, on a bicycle and bribes the boy with the gold leaf the King gives him. The boy lets him build a bicycle in his graveyard of bicycles. Will Vithy make it to the border on his struggle to find his older brother? Reviews of Little Brother were positive. Although Kirkus Reviews found "The atrocities and privations that make... Other refugee stories so searing are kept offstage here. Publishers Weekly stated that "Baillie sensitively expresses the depth of Vithy's loneliness while exploring the boy's growing independence and gradual rebuilding of trust." And "Offering insight into the Vietnamese/Cambodian experience, this haunting tale confirms the universality of human instincts and emotions."

Valerie Bierman, writing for Books for Keeps, believed it "a gem which deserves to become a classic, it only to demonstrate to children the futility and cruelty of war." The Children's Book Council of Australia - Children's Book of the Year Awards 1986 - Highly commended