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Incest in popular culture

Incest is a popular topic in English erotic fiction. Incest is sometimes described in mainstream, non-erotic fiction. Connotations can be positive, or neutral. In the "Weird Al" Yankovic song, "A Complicated Song", a parody of the Avril Lavigne song, "Complicated", one of the verses is about the main character noticing how his fiancée has a tattoo of her family crest, realizes it is his own family's crest, that she is his cousin. British musician Kate Bush's song "The Kick Inside" from her 1978 album of the same name depicts an incestuous relationship and suicide involving a brother and sister; the German metal band Rammstein touches on incest in "Spiel mit mir", featuring an incestuous relationship between brothers. In "Spiel mit mir", the older brother forces himself on his younger brother for sex so he will be able to sleep. Rammstein has written other songs dealing with incest including "Laichzeit" and "Tier"; the so-called "Mamasan Trilogy" by Seattle rock group Pearl Jam tells the story of a man's incestuous relationship with his mother and the subsequent unfolding events.

The trilogy begins with "Alive", which singer Eddie Vedder explains as being part autobiographical and part fiction. When Eddie was a teenager, his mother revealed to him that the man he thought was his father was his stepfather, his biological father was dead, it is the first piece to a trilogy of songs: "Alive", "Once" and "Footsteps." "Alive" tells a story of incest, which leads to the murderous killing spree described in "Once", looking back from a prison cell in "Footsteps". The song "This Love is Fucking Right" by The Pains of Being Pure at Heart is about a consensual romantic relationship between a brother and sister; the Prize Fighter Inferno released a song titled "Our Darling Daughter You Are, Little Cecillia Marie" on the album My Brother's Blood Machine, detailing a case of habitual father/daughter molestation, resulting in her attempted murder of her father. "Embryo" by the Japanese band Dir En Grey is about a mother dying and the father raping the daughter. At the end of the song, the girl discovers she is pregnant with his child.

The song "Lemon Incest" by Charlotte and Serge Gainsbourg is a song and music video about an incestuous relationship between a father and his daughter, which caused controversy because the singers themselves were father and daughter, it caused suspicions that the song may be autobiographical. Stirring the pot, the single cover is a picture of the half-clothed Serge with his daughter Charlotte lying across his chest. However, the Gainsbourgs denied these allegations and the song became popular in France. Another reference to incest is included in "The End" by psychedelic rock band The Doors, in which Jim Morrison sings, "Father/ Yes son?/ I want to kill you/ Mother, I want to...." British musician Kate Bush's song "The Kick Inside" from her 1978 album of the same name depicts an incestuous relationship and suicide involving a brother and sister. The German metal band Rammstein touches on incest in "Spiel mit mir", featuring an incestuous relationship between brothers. In "Spiel mit mir", the older brother forces himself on his younger brother for sex so he will be able to sleep.

Rammstein has written other songs dealing with incest including "Laichzeit" and "Tier". The death metal band Cancer has a song on the album Death Shall Rise called "Tasteless Incest", a song about an old man raping his own family, it is described that he hopes his children will rape their children as well, which happens with sexual abuse. The so-called "Mamasan Trilogy" by Seattle rockers Pearl Jam tells the story of a man's incestuous relationship with his mother and the subsequent unfolding events; the trilogy begins with Alive, which singer Eddie Vedder explains as being part autobiographical and part fiction. When Eddie was a teenager, his mother revealed to him that the man he thought was his father was his stepfather, his biological father was dead, it is the first piece to a trilogy of songs: "Alive", "Once" and "Footsteps." "Alive" tells a story of incest, which leads to the murderous killing spree described in "Once", looking back from a prison cell in "Footsteps". The song "This Love is Fucking Right" by The Pains of Being Pure at Heart is about a consensual romantic relationship between a brother and sister.

South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut features the song "Uncle Fucka", in which accusations of incest are levelled by Terrance and Phillip. A thirteen-year-old boy is molested by his mother because he looks like his deceased father in the song "Alive" by Pearl Jam, from the album Ten; the Prize Fighter Inferno released a song titled "Our Darling Daughter You Are, Little Cecillia Marie" on the album My Brother's Blood Machine, detailing a case of habitual father/daughter incest/rape, resulting in her attempted murder of her father. "Embryo" by the Japanese band Dir En Grey is about a mother dying and the father raping the daughter. At the end of the song, the girl discovers she is pregnant with his child; the song Lemon Incest by Charlotte and Serge Gainsbourg is a song and music video about an incestuous relationship between a father and his daughter. The single cover is a picture of the half-clothed father with his daughter lying across his chest. Considering that father/daughter was the same family tie that the singers shared it caused suspicions that the song may be autobiographical.

However, the Gainsbourgs denied these allegatio

Kapuskasing

Kapuskasing is a town on the Kapuskasing River in the Cochrane District of Northern Ontario, Canada 92 kilometres east of Hearst. The town was known as MacPherson until 1917, when the name was changed so as not to conflict with another railway stop in Manitoba; the town of Kapuskasing gets its name from the Kapuskasing River, named long before the existence of the town. Kapuskasing is a word of Cree origin meaning "Bend in the river"; the first reported survey of the district in which Kapuskasing lies was carried out in 1875 by Dr. Robert Bell of the Geological Survey of Canada, he referred to the Kapuskasing River as the "Kai-bush-ka-sing". According to Bell's information, the Kapuskasing River derived its name from the lake at its head. In 1900, the Bureau of Colonization of the Ontario Department of Agriculture sent parties to survey the region north of the Canadian Pacific Railway between the Quebec border and Lake Nipigon, their main interest was to seek out and delimit areas for further agricultural settlements that would give Ontario a new farming frontier to offset the attraction of the western prairies.

In 1900, the Department of Crown Lands commissioned a Survey of Exploration of Northern Ontario. Survey parties were sent out to explore and report back to the Province on the various resources of water power, etc. that might be available for exploitation. No roads existed, but northern Cree Indians and fur traders had used the local rivers connecting to James Bay for centuries. In the summer of 1900 groups of surveyors traveled the many rivers of this remote area documenting their findings; the results were published by order of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario as "Report of the Survey of Exploration of Northern Ontario 1900". The section of the report detailing exploration of the Kapuskasing River contains references to the local Cree names for Sturgeon Falls, White Spruce Rapids, Kapuskasing River and Big Beaver Falls, among others. Surveyors who explored the Kapuskasing River and tributaries in 1900 had local Cree guides familiar with the country who provided the local place names and their meanings to them.

In this report the word Kapuskasing is said to mean "Whispering Water". At the location where the CNR crossed the Kapuskasing River in 1910 there was an island in the centre of the river. Power and storage dams were built at that location in 1923. Prior to the dam construction the rapids at that location was known as "White Spruce Rapids" and known as "Spruce Falls"; the first Spruce Falls Company of 1920 took its name from these rapids. Kapuskasing lies in the heart of the Great Clay Belt; the topography of the region is flat, dotted with numerous small lakes and muskeg bogs. In the heart of Canada's boreal forest, the region is drained by rivers running north to James Bay; the district is forested by thick stands of black spruce that have commercial value as pulpwood. The area has long cold winters; the summer growing season is short and punctuated by killing frosts. Visitors comment on the deep blue of the sky during clear weather. Wildlife is abundant. Species such as moose, black bear and red fox are seen in the area.

Lakes and rivers are well populated with northern pike and yellow perch. Fishing and hunting are popular recreational activities locally. Located near the western edge of the Clay Belt of "New Ontario", the town was founded in the early 20th century after the National Transcontinental Railway, forerunner of the Canadian National Railway, was built through the area in 1911. An Ontario Historical Plaque was erected by the province to commemorate the founding of Kapuskasing's role in Ontario's heritage. An Internment camp was set up at Bunk Houses in Kapuskasing from December 1914 to February 1920. A scheme to settle veterans of the First World War in this vicinity was unsuccessful, it was not until the start of pulp and paper milling operations in the 1920s that Kapuskasing began to develop as an organized community. The Kapuskasing River Pulp and Timber limit, that included 4,500 square kilometres of timber and hydro leases at Sturgeon Falls, White Spruce Rapids and Big Beaver Falls, was awarded to speculators Saphrenous A. Mundy and Elihu Stewart in 1917, Spruce Falls Pulp and Paper Ltd. was incorporated, but no development took place.

The still unexploited timber limits were sold to Kimberly-Clark in 1920. The new Spruce Falls Company Ltd. began the development of the first pulp mill in Kapuskasing under the direction of F. J. Sensenbrenner, a Vice President of Kimberly Clark Corporation for the next 20 years; the small sulphite mill started up in late 1922 with four 12-ton digesters and a daily output of 75 tons of pulp. Spent liquor was discharged untreated into the Kapuskasing River. Early development was plagued by major setbacks. Fire destroyed the construction power project at Sturgeon Falls. A year's supply of pulpwood, boomed up in the river was washed away in the spring flood. A fire at the new mill brought production to a halt. In 1923, a water storage and hydro electric dam was built by Morrow and Beatty Ltd. of Peterborough at Spruce Falls. In 1925, the Spruce Falls Company Limited was awarded additional timber limits to the north and south, bringing their total limits up to 11,830 square kilometres. In 1926, the Spruce Falls Power and Paper Company was incorporated under joint ownership of Kimberly-Clark and The New York Times.

The new company negotiated two additional hydro power leases to the north on the Mattagami River at Smoky Falls and Devils Rapids. Work to build a 550 ton/day paper mill at Kapuskasing, a 75,000 HP hydro generating station at Smoky Falls and a 80 kilometres ra