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List of United States cities by population

The following is a list of the most populous incorporated places of the United States. As defined by the United States Census Bureau, an "incorporated place" includes a variety of designations, including city, village and municipality. A few exceptional census-designated places are included in the Census Bureau's listing of incorporated places. Consolidated city-counties represent a distinct type of government that includes the entire population of a county, or county equivalent; some consolidated city-counties, include multiple incorporated places. This list presents only that portion of such consolidated city-counties that are not a part of another incorporated place; this list refers only to the population of individual municipalities within their defined limits. Therefore, a different ranking is evident when considering U. S. metropolitan area populations. The following table lists the 314 incorporated places in the United States with a population of at least 100,000 on July 1, 2018, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau.

A city is displayed in bold if it is a state or federal capital, in italics if it is the most populous city in the state. Five states—Delaware, Vermont, West Virginia and Wyoming—have no cities with populations of 100,000 or more; the table below contains the following information: The city rank by population as of July 1, 2018, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau The city name The name of the state in which the city lies The city population as of July 1, 2018, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau The city population as of April 1, 2010, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census The city percent population change from April 1, 2010, to July 1, 2018 The city land area as of January 1, 2016 The city population density as of July 1, 2016 The city latitude and longitude coordinates For cities with populations of 100,000 or more, the following distributions hold. Smaller incorporated places are not included; the mean density is 4,128.21 inhabitants per square mile. The median is 3,160.85 inhabitants per square mile.

The following table lists the five municipalities of Puerto Rico with a population greater than 100,000 on July 1, 2017, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau. The table below contains the following information: The municipio rank by population as of July 1, 2017, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau The municipio The municipio population as of July 1, 2017, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau The municipio population as of April 1, 2010, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census The municipio percent population change from April 1, 2010, to July 1, 2017 The municipio land area as of January 1, 2016 The municipio population density as of July 1, 2017 The municipio latitude and longitude coordinates The following table lists U. S. census-designated places with populations of at least 100,000 according to the 2010 Census. A CDP is a concentration of population identified by the United States Census Bureau for statistical purposes. CDPs are delineated for each decennial census as the statistical counterparts of incorporated places such as cities and villages.

CDPs are populated areas that lack separate municipal government, but which otherwise physically resemble incorporated places. Unlike the incorporated cities in the main list, the US Census Bureau does not release annual population estimates for CDPs; the table below contains the following information: The city The state The city population as of April 1, 2010, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census The city population as of April 1, 2000, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census The city percent population change from April 1, 2000, to April 1, 2010 The city land area as of January 1, 2010 The city population density as of April 1, 2010 The city ANSI INCITS 446–2008 geographic code The city latitude and longitude coordinates The following table lists U. S. cities that, in past censuses, have had populations of at least 100,000 but have since decreased beneath this threshold or have been consolidated with or annexed into a neighboring city. The table below contains the following information: Name of city Name of state The city population as of July 1, 2018, as estimated by the United States Census Bureau The city's peak population based on highest official enumeration recorded by the Census The numeric decline in population from its peak Census count to the most recent Census estimate in 2018.

The percent decline in population from its peak Census count to the most recent Census estimate in 2018. Any additional notes of significant importance. Demographics of the United States United States Census Bureau List of U. S. states and territories by population List of metropolitan areas in the United States List of United States counties and county equivalents United States Office of Management and Budget The OMB has defined 1098 statistical areas comprising 388 MSAs, 541 μSAs, 169 CSAs Primary statistical area – List of the 574 PSAs Combined Statistical Area – List of the 169 CSAs Core Based Statistical Area – List of the 929 CBSAs Metropolitan Statistical Area – List of the 388 MSAs Micropolitan Statistical Area – List of the 541 μSAs Largest cities in the United States by population by decade List of U. S. states' largest cities by population List of cities proper by population List of United States cities by area List of United States cities by elevation List of United Stat

Experian

Experian plc is an Irish-domiciled multinational consumer credit reporting company. Experian collects and aggregates information on over one billion people and businesses including 235 million individual U. S. consumers and more than 25 million U. S. businesses. Based in Dublin, the company operates in 37 countries with offices in Brazil, the United Kingdom, the United States; the company employs 17,000 people and reported revenue for 2018 of US$4.6 billion. It is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index. Experian is a partner in the U. K. government's USPS Address Validation. It is one of the "Big Three" credit-reporting agencies, alongside Equifax. In addition to its credit services, Experian sells decision analytic and marketing assistance to businesses, including individual fingerprinting and targeting, its consumer services include online access to credit history and products meant to protect from fraud and identity theft. Like all credit reporting agencies, the company is required by U. S. law to provide consumers with one free credit report every year.

The company was established in the United States as TRW Information Systems and Services Inc. a subsidiary of TRW Inc. when it acquired Credit Data in 1968. In November 1996, TRW sold the unit, as Experian, to two Boston private equity firms: Bain Capital and Thomas H. Lee Partners. Just one month the two firms sold Experian to The Great Universal Stores Limited, a retail conglomerate with millions of customers paying for goods on credit, based in Manchester, England; the Great Universal Stores Limited had employed John Peace, a computer programmer, to combine the mail order data from various of its subsidiaries and businesses to create a central database, to, added electoral roll data as well as county court judgements. The original computerized credit referencing software was created at Midland Household Stores, part of the retail sector of GUS, in 1971, designed by John Edwards and programmed by Richard Brown. GUS's database was commercialised in 1980 under the name Commercial Credit Nottingham.

So when The Great Universal Stores Limited acquired Experian in 1996, Experian was merged into CCN. During the next ten years, Experian broadened its product range to new industry sectors, beyond financial services, entered new markets such as Latin America, Asia Pacific and Eastern Europe; the business expanded through acquisitions. In October 2006 Experian was demerged from the British company GUS and listed on the London Stock Exchange. In August 2005, Experian accepted a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission over charges that Experian had violated a previous settlement with the FTC; the FTC's allegations concerned customers who signed up for the "free credit report" at Experian's Consumerinfo.com site. The FTC alleged that ads for the "free credit report" did not adequately disclose that Experian would automatically enroll customers in Experian's $79.95 credit-monitoring program. In January 2008, Experian announced that it would cut more than 200 jobs at its Nottingham office as it moved development work to India to reduce costs.

Experian shut down its Canadian operations on 14 April 2009. In March 2017, Experian agreed to pay a $3 million fine related to giving credit scores to consumers that were not their true credit score; the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was the United States federal agency. In May 2018, Experian and Mitek formed a partnership to add identity document verification and biometric facial matching to its digital identity verification software. Experian's CrossCore fraud prevention and identity platform will feature Mitek's Mobile Verify and Mobile Fill solutions to deliver seamless new account opening and help businesses achieve compliance and mitigate fraud exposure, according to the announcement. In December 2019, Experian integrated its data on AWS Data Exchange. In the United States, like the other major credit reporting bureaus, Experian is chiefly regulated by the Fair Credit Reporting Act; the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003, signed into law in 2003, amended the FCRA to require the credit reporting companies to provide consumers with one free copy of their credit report per 12-month period.

Like its main competitors, TransUnion and Equifax, Experian markets credit reports directly to consumers. Experian markets its for-profit credit reporting service, FreeCreditReport.com, all three agencies have been criticised and sued for selling credit reports that can be obtained at no cost. Its market segmentation tool, Mosaic, is used by political parties to identify groups of voters. In the British version there are 15 main groups, broken down into 89 hyperspecific categories, from "corporate chieftains" to "golden empty-nesters" which can be taken down to the level of individual postcodes, it was first used by the Labour Party, but taken up by the Conservatives in the 2015 General Election campaign. In 2013 a Vietnamese national, Hieu Minh Ngo, was charged by the U. S. Department of Justice with attempting to sell identifiable information on hundreds of thousands of U. S. residents. This information had been purchased from Experian subsidiary and data aggregator Court Ventures; however Ngo testified under oath that the information he had sold to identity thieves had been acquired from another hacker based out of Russia, not Experian or Court Ventures.

Ngo resold the information he acquired from the Russian hacker through the identity fraud enabling websites Superget.info and Findget.me. The information offered for anonymous sale on these websites included individual's name, Social Security number, date of birth