Tyndis

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Tyndis (Tondis Tundis or Thundi) was an ancient Indian seaport and harbor-town mentioned in the ancient Greek writings, such as the Periplus Maris Erythraei. It was located north of Muziris (Muchiri) in the Limyrike region (modern Malabar Coast in Kerala) of the Chera Kingdom (Keprobotos).

Location[edit]

The location of Muziris provides clues for the location Tyndis, which was 500 stades before it; the exact location of the port is still unknown. Possible candidates include the following modern locations:

It is estimated that the northern border of the Kingdom of Cherala Putras (Keprobotos) was located just north of Tyndis.[3]

Description[edit]

Greek sources[edit]

Tyndis was a major center of trade, next only to Muziris, between the Cheras and the Roman Empire in the early centuries of the Christian era. A branch of the Chera royal family is also said to have established itself at Tyndis, it is also speculated that Tyndis (along with ports such as Naura, Bakare and Nelkynda) operated as a satellite feeding port to Muziris.[4]

Periplus Maris Erythraei (c. 1st century) mentions Tyndis as an important coastal village close to the shore situated 500 stadia (about 60 miles) north to Muziris. It is also described as one of the first ports of trade of Limyrike along with Naura. Later, Tyndis rose into a prominent sea-port town in the coast. By the time Claudius Ptolemy wrote, Tyndis had grown large enough for him to call it (Geog. 7.1.8) a city (polis).[5]

The Tabula Peutingeriana, a set of ancient maps, also locates Tundis near Muziris.

Indian sources[edit]

Tyndis may be mentioned as Tondi in the Tamil writings.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Syed Muhammad Husayn Nainar (2011). Arab Geographers' Knolwedge of Southern India. Other Books. p. 76. ISBN 978-93-80081-10-6.
  2. ^ Lionel Casson 2012, p. 297.
  3. ^ Lionel Casson 2012.
  4. ^ Coastal Histories: Society and Ecology in Pre-modern India, Yogesh Sharma, Primus Books 2010
  5. ^ Lionel Casson 2012, p. 213.
  6. ^ K.S. Mathew (25 November 2016). Imperial Rome, Indian Ocean Regions and Muziris: New Perspectives on Maritime Trade. Taylor & Francis. p. 275. ISBN 978-1-351-99752-2.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]