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Window Rock, Arizona

Window Rock is a small city that serves as the seat of government and capital of the Navajo Nation, the largest territory of a sovereign American Indian nation in North America. It lies within the boundaries of the St. Michaels Chapter, adjacent to the Arizona and New Mexico state line. Window Rock hosts the Navajo Nation governmental campus which contains the Navajo Nation Council, Navajo Nation Supreme Court, the offices of the Navajo Nation President and Vice President, many Navajo government buildings. Window Rock's population was 2,712 at the 2010 census, but is estimated to reach around 20,000 during weekdays when tribal offices are open. Window Rock's main attraction is the window formation of sandstone; the Navajo Nation Museum, the Navajo Nation Zoological and Botanical Park, the Navajo Nation Code Talkers World War II memorial are located in Window Rock. Until 1936, the area was sparsely populated and known only by its ceremonial name Niʼ Ałníiʼgi. John Collier, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, chose the site to establish the seat of the Navajo Central Agency.

His proposal to make the ceremonial name the official name met with resistance and Navajos soon ridiculed it as "ni ałnííʼgóó". Due to this, the name of the major local landmark, the rock-with-hole-through-it was chosen and rendered in English as "Window Rock". Tségháhoodzání, north of the Navajo governmental administration buildings, is important in the traditional Navajo Water Way Ceremony, it was one of the four places where Navajo medicine men go with their traditional woven water jugs to get water for the ceremony, held for the abundance of rainfall. Window Rock is the capital of the Navajo Nation government which houses the Navajo Nation President and Vice President, Navajo Nation Supreme Court, the 24-member Navajo Nation Council, Navajo government administration buildings; as a district within the St. Michaels Chapter, Window Rock is served by a Navajo Council Delegate and Chapter President and Vice President. Window Rock is located at 35°40′22″N 109°3′44″W; the Arizona/New Mexico state line marks the town's eastern edge, some of the town's buildings are located a few feet from the state line.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the Window Rock CDP has a total area of 5.3 square miles, all land. The area is atop the Defiance Plateau. Window Rock is categorized as being within the 6a USDA hardiness zone, meaning the average yearly low temperature is between −10 and −5 °F; the city is cooler than most of Arizona due to its high elevation. The greater Window Rock area comprises the Fort Defiance and St. Michaels chapters, the hamlets of Hunter's Point and the Summit, Tse Bonito on the New Mexico side of the border with Arizona; as of the census of 2000, there were 3,059 people, 876 households, 713 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 589.3 people per square mile. There were 998 housing units at an average density of 192.3/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.46% Native American, 3.17% White, 0.42% Asian, 0.16% African American, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.07% from other races, 0.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.44% of the population.

There were 876 households out of which 51.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 29.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 18.6% were non-families. 15.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.4% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.42 and the average family size was 3.81. In the CDP, the age distribution of the population shows 36.3% under the age of 18, 10.9% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, 4.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 27 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.4 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $36,885, the median income for a family was $36,500. Males had a median income of $27,266 versus $26,902 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $11,122. About 24.6% of families and 24.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.6% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.

Window Rock is a part of the Window Rock Unified School District, which serves the greater Fort Defiance and St. Michaels chapters population center. Window Rock is served by: Window Rock Elementary School Tséhootsooí Middle School Window Rock High School located in the Fort Defiance Chapter; the community is served by the private Saint Michael Indian School, a K-12 private, Catholic school established by Katharine Drexel in 1902. Saint Michael Indian School is a member of the National Catholic Education Association and the Diocese of Gallup Catholic School System; the surrounding community is served by the Hilltop Christian School, operated by the Western Indian Ministries offering pre-K through 6th grade learning curriculum. In addition, the Saint Michaels Association for Special Education, Inc. school serves the greater Navajo Nation in Arizona and New Mexico. A non-profit school, founded by Sister Marijane Ryan in 1970 serves as an educational and residential center for individuals with disabilities of all ages.

Tourism is an integral part of the local economy. Window Rock attracts a large number of tourists and visitors due to its close proximity to many national parks and sites and Navajo government; the area is a popular base of commerce for the regional people as

Clavister

Clavister is a Swedish company specialized in network security software, listed on NASDAQ First North. According to a report from 451 Research, the Edward Snowden NSA leaks and consequent loss of trust with US-based products has helped with the international expansion of Clavister. Clavister has a global presence with customers such as the Japanese NTT-BP and the German Marbach Group. Clavister has partnerships with for example the Japanese Canon-ITS, in the area of virtualized network security with Nokia Networks and Artesyn. Comparison of firewalls Business data for Clavister: Reuters, Yahoo! Finance, Bloomberg Full version of the 451research report cited on the references above

Essex County, Virginia

Essex County is a county located in the Middle Peninsula in the U. S. state of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,151, its county seat is Tappahannock. Essex County was established in 1692 from Virginia; the county is named for the Earl of Essex. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 286 square miles, of which 257 square miles is land and 29 square miles is water, its main town, Tappahanock, is focused at the Rappahanock River. Westmoreland County – north Richmond County – northeast Middlesex County – southeast King and Queen County – south Caroline County – west King George County – northwest US 17 US 360 Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge Hutchinson unit, Thomas unit As of the census of 2000, there were 9,989 people, 3,995 households, 2,740 families residing in the county; the population density was 39 people per square mile. There were 4,926 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile; the racial makeup of the county was 57.96% White, 39.04% Black or African American, 0.55% Native American, 0.81% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, 1.28% from two or more races.

0.72% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 3,995 households out of which 28.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.70% were married couples living together, 14.00% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.40% were non-families. 26.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.30% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.95. In the county, the population was spread out with 22.90% under the age of 18, 7.00% from 18 to 24, 27.00% from 25 to 44, 25.70% from 45 to 64, 17.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 89.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.20 males. The median income for a household in the county was $37,395, the median income for a family was $43,588. Males had a median income of $29,736 versus $22,253 for females; the per capita income for the county was $17,994.

About 7.70% of families and 11.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.80% of those under age 18 and 11.80% of those age 65 or over. Central District: John Magruder Greater Tappahannock District: Robert Akers North District: Sidney N. Johnson South District: Margaret H. "Prue" Davis At-Large: Edwin E. "Bud" Smith Jr. Clerk of the Circuit Court: Gayle J. Ashworth Commissioner of the Revenue: Thomas M. Blackwell Commonwealth's Attorney: Vince S. Donoghue Sheriff: Walter "Arnie" Holmes Treasurer: B. A. "Penny" Davis Essex is represented by Republican Ryan T. McDougle in the Virginia Senate, Republican M. Keith Hodges in the Virginia House of Delegates, Republican Robert J. "Rob" Wittman in the U. S. House of Representatives. Essex County Public Schools is the public schools system for Essex County, United States; the following schools make up the Essex County Public Schools system: Tappahannock Elementary School Essex Intermediate School Essex High School Other schools located in Essex County include: St Margaret's School Tappahannock Junior Academy Aylett Country Day School Tappahannock David George - African American ex-slave founder of Silver Bluff Baptist Church Former NBA player Xavier McDaniel once lived in this county.

U. S. Senator Paul S. Trible, Jr. was Commonwealth's Attorney of Essex County. Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter, 1809-1887. Speaker of the United States House of Representatives and Confederate States Secretary of State. Grammy Award-nominated R&B singer Chris Brown was raised in this county. Richard B. Garnett- Confederate States of America general, killed while leading his brigade during Pickett's Charge. National Register of Historic Places listings in Essex County, Virginia Official website Essex County Museum